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February 15th, 2006

I spoke with my ex, and found out that he had to put his dog down, the beloved Sasha.

I grew to totally adore and love that dog during our 6.5 years together. She was one of the sweetest dogs in the world -- so gentle! You could put a steak in front of her face, and she would wait for you to say, "Go ahead," before eating it.

And she played with his three cats like she was one of them, including getting that long body of hers up on the couch and walking across the top of it like cats do.

She had a great life, though. He put her to sleep on her birthday, a life lived of exactly 15 years.

GOODBYE MY SWEET GIRL




We gave our group presentation today, and I must say, "We nailed that bitch!" At least I thought so.

It will be interesting to see what kind of grade we get on it, and how it's graded. I'm assuming all three of us will get the same grade, but don't really know for sure. The professor is hard to read, and she has a reputation of being a "strict" grader.

She did say after we presented, though, that our presentation should be a model to the remaining groups presenting -- in terms of organization and covering the things she wants covered. That sounds like she liked it.

I'm sure the people in the remaining groups had a collective groan in their minds, and thought, "Thanks a lot, assholes."

More important to me than the prof's words though, was the fact that three or four students actually said, "Good presentation" to us on their way out of class.



As part of my demo of LambdaMOO during my part of the presentation, I gave an example of how I had used the functionality available to create objects, by showing a room I had created, and an object in that room.

LambdaMOO is full of rooms such as the linen closet, the bathroom, the master bedroom, the living room, etc. And after entering a couple of those standard rooms, I went to the room that I had created myself.

It's important to note that the classroom we meet in is in Winston Hall, Room 209. I used the "teleport" feature to "beam" to the new room I had created, and when you arrive in a room, it displays the name and description of the room, which I had programmed:

Winston Hall, Room 209
You have entered a classroom where a course called Internet & Society is being taught. There are three people in front of the class who are really into what they are doing. There are 17 students present -- give or take a few. Two of them are sleeping -- outright. Another's elbow keeps sliding off the end of the desk as she nods off. The professor is way over to the right side of the room, near the windows, putting marks in everyone's permanent record. There is some sophisticated audio-visual equipment in the room, but under the watchful eye of the professor. There is a discarded blog entry on the floor. Today's roster is stuck in limbo on an empty desk. You see a roster here.

This was perfect as the teacher was sitting in her "regular spot," where she is, of course, taking notes about the presentation to grade us as we go along. She passes around a piece of paper, the roster, for us to sign our name on for attendance.

I then said, "So that's the room, and the object I created is 'a roster.' We can examine that more closely with the 'look' command."

<look a roster>
The roster is a single sheet of paper on which to take attendance. If you pick it up and start it moving again, you may be perceived as the teacher's pet.

This all got quite the chuckle, and made the point about object-oriented languages being used to create new objects in MUDs. Yippee!



Dancing was just alright tonight. We reviewed Dizzy again, which is good. That dance takes some practice.

I had my mid-term on my mind, which is due tomorrow by 3:00, a lot tonight, which lowered the dancing fun factor a little.

I worked on it until about 2:00AM once I got home.

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